The paintings of Simon Blackwood

The Paintings of Simon Blackwood
Aya Sofia Istanbul - oil on canvas - 24inches X 30inches - SOLD
The Loire - oil on canvas - 52inches X 50inches - SOLD
Sunfish 1 - oil on canvas - 45inches X 42inches - SOLD
Blue Boat - oil on canvas - 24inches X 30inches - SOLD
Red Fishing Boat - oil on canvas - 36inches X 30inches
Egyptian Consulate Bebek - oil on canvas - 30inches X 24inches - SOLD
Light on Rule Water - oil on canvas - 45inches X 42inches - SOLD
Sailing Woods Hole Cape Cod - oil on canvas - 55inches X 50inches - SOLD
Rule Water Crack Willow - oil on canvas - 36inches X 30inches - SOLD
Dancing on the edge of the Ocean - oil on canvas - 45inches X 42inches
Dancing on the edge of the Ocean 2 - oil on canvas - 45inches X 42inches
Uskudar Ferry - pastel on Whatman paper - 20inches X 16inches
Whether by a river, lake or the sea these places are perfect for contemplation where the sound and light refractions are the predominant inspiration to the senses.
A flowing river is the perfect paradym for meditation where focus is required as each ripple ceaselessly demands attention making the contemplation of the whole transient and fleeting.
Each River or Burn in the Scottish Borders has its own language and as an American visitor to the studio observed, “ the sound is all consuming - it even blots out tinitus!”

From his studio in Istanbul during the 1980’s and 90’s Simon was able to watch the Bosphorus 24 hours a day with all it’s business and constantly changing light. Many paintings were born from this period, some verging on abstraction, but all attempting to capture a fleeting moment of beauty. Some of these fantastic light effects seem fanciful until you fall in love with this City and spend time there.
One of the first studies in the Istanbul series is the Blue Boat (thumbnail 4 in this series) which appeared in Country Life in the 1980’s. The artist was commissioned to visit the Chateau du Tourreaux in Provence on the strength of this (see Paintings 3).
Water remains a primary muse in Simons' work